Grazie per la tua valutazione.

Contattaci tramite questo form.
Email:
Soggetto:
Messaggio

World News Goalkeepers | Notizie ed articoli in lingua straniera dal mondo del Portiere

responsiveresponsiveCarrellata di notizie reperite nella Rete dai vari siti tematici esteri, di particolare interesse, in lingua straniera, ed inerenti il mondo del Calcio in generale, dalla metodologia di lavoro alla curiosità. responsive

The science of penalty shootouts: How teams are using data to win

The most important few minutes of Gianluigi Buffon's career were the penalties that decided the Italy-France World Cup final in 2006. Going into the shootout, the Italian keeper didn't feel confident. "I was not in tune with what was happening.

The most important few minutes of Gianluigi Buffon's career were the penalties that decided the Italy-France World Cup final in 2006. Going into the shootout, the Italian keeper didn't feel confident. "I was not in tune with what was happening.

It seemed to me that France could have taken 2000 penalties and scored all of them."

Buffon wasn't the kind of keeper who prepared for shootouts by studying opposition kickers. Instead he relied on intuition. But then his Juventus teammate David Trezeguet stepped up to shoot for France. Trezeguet and Buffon knew each other intimately. They sometimes practiced penalties after training sessions, writes British author Ben Lyttleton in his book on penalties, "Twelve Yards".

Facing a keeper who knew his repertoire, Trezeguet decided he had to take a difficult kick: high in the left-hand corner. Had he hit it a few centimeters lower, football history might have been different, but his shot crashed out off the crossbar. Buffon had got lucky, and went on to win the biggest prize of his career.

On Saturday, June 3 in Cardiff, Wales, the 39-year-old Buffon will play what might turn out to be his last final, against Real Madrid in the Champions League. Finals are often decided on shootouts. If that happens this time, intuition might not be enough for Buffon. As Real Madrid showed in last year's final, shootouts are increasingly being decided by science.

The scientific era of the penalty shootout probably began with the Chelsea-Manchester United Champions League final in Moscow in 2008. Chelsea's coach Avram Grant received help from a Spanish economist named Ignacio Palacios Huerta, who had spent years building a database of thousands of penalties. Nobody can be sure what the world's best kickers and keepers will do on any given penalty, but Ignacio (he and I have since become friends) had enough information to make better guesses than anyone else. His database had revealed a crucial fact about United's keeper Edwin van der Sar: on penalties, the Dutchman often dived to his right.

continua a leggere .......

di Simon Kuper

( Fonte ESPN FC )

Pin It

Altre Notizie | Notizie varie in lingua straniera dal mondo del Calcio